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Incident Investigation: Forming An Effective Team & Gathering Information

Product Description

Putting together an effective team to gather information is a key step in the incident investigation process. Without the proper team in place, important details may get overlooked. This program covers how to put together an efficient investigative team made up of personnel qualified to examine every aspect of an incident. You'll also hear conducting interviews using the right types of questions and gathering information that will form the foundation of your investigation.

Step Two: Forming The Investigative Team
Your investigative team can and should be a diverse group of personnel types, such as managers, safety officers, technicians, engineers, operational specialists, even union representatives. Incidents are made up of a wide variety of factors that can involve a cross-section of your workplace. Wherever the incident took place, you'll need to recruit team members who are familiar with that area.

Once the investigation is finished, the team chairperson is responsible for making sure the final report is complete and that the results are communicated properly to management.

Step Three: Determine the Facts
Conducting Interviews: When your team is assembled and you all are familiar with the details of the initial incident report, it's time to start gathering information and conducting interviews. There are three distinct areas you'll want to question as you gather information &#8212 physical factors, human factors and operating systems.

Interviewing Methods: Whether you are talking with one person or a group of people, good interviewing skills are essential to gathering information and establishing an atmosphere of inquiry, not blame. One of the keys to successful interviewing is remember that it is an information sharing activity. Find a neutral location to conduct the interview.

Reflection: Successful communication depends on a clear understanding of what was actually said, not what you think you heard, so take time to reflect.

Interviewing Dos and Don'ts: Do listen, empathize, and be positive. Don't rush, prejudge or blame. Don't interrupt and don't get impatient.

Added features and benefits of DVD training include:

  • A customizable PowerPoint presentation
  • Informative training points and bonus material for refresher or training talks
  • Video-enriched training organized by learning objectives that facilitates discussion
  • A printable Leader's Guide
  • Resourceful web links to organizations such as OSHA, FEMA, NSC and the CDC, where viewers can download and print information on regulatory standards.

Putting together an effective team to gather information is a key step in the incident investigation process. Without the proper team in place, important details may get overlooked. This program covers how to put together an efficient investigative team made up of personnel qualified to examine every aspect of an incident. You'll also hear conducting interviews using the right types of questions and gathering information that will form the foundation of your investigation.

Step Two: Forming The Investigative Team
Your investigative team can and should be a diverse group of personnel types, such as managers, safety officers, technicians, engineers, operational specialists, even union representatives. Incidents are made up of a wide variety of factors that can involve a cross-section of your workplace. Wherever the incident took place, you'll need to recruit team members who are familiar with that area.

Once the investigation is finished, the team chairperson is responsible for making sure the final report is complete and that the results are communicated properly to management.

Step Three: Determine the Facts
Conducting Interviews: When your team is assembled and you all are familiar with the details of the initial incident report, it's time to start gathering information and conducting interviews. There are three distinct areas you'll want to question as you gather information &#8212 physical factors, human factors and operating systems.

Interviewing Methods: Whether you are talking with one person or a group of people, good interviewing skills are essential to gathering information and establishing an atmosphere of inquiry, not blame. One of the keys to successful interviewing is remember that it is an information sharing activity. Find a neutral location to conduct the interview.

Reflection: Successful communication depends on a clear understanding of what was actually said, not what you think you heard, so take time to reflect.

Interviewing Dos and Don'ts: Do listen, empathize, and be positive. Don't rush, prejudge or blame. Don't interrupt and don't get impatient.

Workbooks contain lesson introductions, a practice and application area, and lesson progress checks to measure students' learning.

Putting together an effective team to gather information is a key step in the incident investigation process. Without the proper team in place, important details may get overlooked. This program covers how to put together an efficient investigative team made up of personnel qualified to examine every aspect of an incident. You'll also hear conducting interviews using the right types of questions and gathering information that will form the foundation of your investigation.

Step Two: Forming The Investigative Team
Your investigative team can and should be a diverse group of personnel types, such as managers, safety officers, technicians, engineers, operational specialists, even union representatives. Incidents are made up of a wide variety of factors that can involve a cross-section of your workplace. Wherever the incident took place, you'll need to recruit team members who are familiar with that area.

Once the investigation is finished, the team chairperson is responsible for making sure the final report is complete and that the results are communicated properly to management.

Step Three: Determine the Facts
Conducting Interviews: When your team is assembled and you all are familiar with the details of the initial incident report, it's time to start gathering information and conducting interviews. There are three distinct areas you'll want to question as you gather information &#8212 physical factors, human factors and operating systems.

Interviewing Methods: Whether you are talking with one person or a group of people, good interviewing skills are essential to gathering information and establishing an atmosphere of inquiry, not blame. One of the keys to successful interviewing is remember that it is an information sharing activity. Find a neutral location to conduct the interview.

Reflection: Successful communication depends on a clear understanding of what was actually said, not what you think you heard, so take time to reflect.

Interviewing Dos and Don'ts: Do listen, empathize, and be positive. Don't rush, prejudge or blame. Don't interrupt and don't get impatient.

To learn more about our interactive online courseware, visit our DuPont™ eLearning Suite homepage or schedule a free online demonstration.

Quantity:
Length:
SKU: INV002

Other Details

FORMAT:
ESP
RUNTIME:
21
STRDVDESP:
INV002-STR-ENG/SE/
STRINTENG:
INV002-HML-ENG/SE/
STRINTENG:
INV002-INT-ENG/SE/